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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
murdoch's newspapers in great britain now face their own accusations of appallinging wrong doing. their report target no less than the royal family and a former prime minister. in fact, gordon brown says the paper had links to criminals in order to hack into his bank accounts. and the medical records of his seriously ill son. meanwhile, members of parliament are demanding tough answers from police. how do they not uncover a hacking conspiracy that could mushroom to thousands of victims? let's get the latest from rivers live in london. they are asking murdoch and his son to testify? >> reporter: yeah. i mean, this is a pretty incredible development, inevitable, perhaps given the huge fury about the whole scandal. ruppert and rebecca brooks have been asked to appear before what is a select committee here which is a cross-party committee of members of parliament and can question people about a particular issue. the police involved in the current inquiry and in past inquiries have been questioned by a similar committee this morning. it's a pretty ferocious grilling that they get here
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent along time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an exaordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >> yea
-coverage or visit travelers.com. >>> the scandal shaking up the murdoch empire in britain has now reached this shores with some asking whether news corp's activity here in the united states should be scrutinized. today frank lautenberg submitted a letter to the attorney general where he wrote the limited information already reported in this case raises serious questions about the legality of the conduct of news corporation and its subsidiaries under the fcpa. he goes on to say further investigation may reveal that current reports only scratch the surface of the problems at news corporation. accordingly, i am request that doj and the s.e.c. examine these circumstances and determine whether u.s. laws have been violated. the senator's letter mirrors similar outrage from senator rockefeller from west virginia and senator robert menendez of new jersey and today brought news that murdoch abandoned his bid to take over british sky broadcasting. the question remains how much power should one media baron have. joining us now is stephanie gosk. the withdrawal to the bskyb bid is a blow to rupert mu
your help. >> you got it. thank you. >>> still to come, a feisty question time for britain's prime minister and secretary of state clinton raises eyebrows in china. >>> but michelle obama draws fire from the traditional obama white house, organized labor. our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. it's the at&t network... somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier. all to become the kind of city people want to live and work in. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest questions. and the over sixty thousand people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> welcome back. here's the latest news
right now. >>> thanks, wolf. good evening. tonight's britain's tabloid scandal escalates. two rupert murdoch-owned newspapers obtained and published information about prime minister gordon brown's family and finances. and tensions between the united states and syria, near a boiling point tonight. a government that beats its own people when they march peacefully slow to offer help when the united states embassy sund attack. >>> tonight the united states being unable to pay its bills because it's maxed out its credit line. to get more spending power president obama is trying to broker a deal with congress that would slash $2 trillion in red ink over the next decade. republicans refuse to raise taxes. president obama is left to sound like a nagging parent. no breakthrough at this afternoon's white house session. the president will reconvene the talks tomorrow. let's discuss the stakes and politics with jessica yellin and gloria borger. the sound we didn't quite have there was the time saying it's time to rip off the band-aid, eat our peas. he spent a half hour with the key negotiators i
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
, male gland voters -- male land owners. only a loan -- the nobility and great britain had a voice in parliament. and the democracy that have gone on in great britain largely from our example. so that they have representative government in bright -- great mac britain announces such an extent that the house of lords has almost no sway at all. that is learning from their american cousins. host: let us get a response from our guest, karlyn bowman. guest: america has been a beacon to the world and so many ways. americans, when they are asked about democracy promotion, that are skeptical that -- that we know enough to do it a broad and skeptical of the result but certainly they believe the world would be a safer and better place if there were more democracies. i did the caller is also correct that the military, as he said, is very differently regarded ban after vietnam. somebody like david petreaus is one of the most popular people in american life. i think that speaks to the kind of sacrifices he has main, that all those people in the military are making. host: yet those in congress gr
, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before we end the rebuttal portion of this debate, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a century of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so the issue is whether it is possible to
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
the government is ignoring is the fact that our power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people will lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the first thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a b
falls through. but a publisher in britain says it was still expected to publish the book. coming up, we continue our discussion about the debt talks. president obama is meeting with congressional leadership today at the white house. we have a senator coming up, a republican from mississippi, senator roger wicker, but up next, one of the leaders in the house on the democratic side, xavier bacerra. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> who is really going to be going to get fired up over nancy pelosi or john boehner? they are proxies' or shorthands for the incredibly narrow range of choice that we have in an elected officials. >> in "the declaration of independents." reason deede's nick gillespie takes on the two-party system and possible libertarian solutions. sunday night on "q&a." >> this weekend on book tv on c- span2, is everything you know about the ok corral wrong? jeff guinn tells a different story. on "after words," charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the state system. and foreign min
new book, classified, secrecy in the state and post-war britain. and the professionor looks at civil rights in the early 1990s. get the complete schedule. >> live from sthracks, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11 and freedman talks about competitiveness and the economy. the national governors association, this weekend, on line on c-span radio and on c-span. >> i'm very interested in what i call disappearing america. america that may not be here 25 years from now. >> for 30 years carol has traveled the united states documenting the country through her photo lens. follow her story. sunday night on quanchquanch. it's a prelude to the documentary, the library of congress. >> it's all available to you on t vision, radio, on line. and find our content any time through c-span's video library. and we take it on the road with our digital bus and local content vehicle. it's washington your way. the c-span networks. now available more than 100 million homes. provided as a public service. "washington journal" continues. host: we're joined by pedro of reuters. as you look at the u
guidelines are no near as forceful as some countries like france, britain and israel that has proposed legislation for companies to identify when their ads have been altered. some celebrities have spoken about extreme retouching. kate winslet took legal action for making her too thin and brad pitt ask his "w" magazine cover not be retouched. i got to tell you that sometimes i think my life would be better if i was 10 pounds thinner. how messed up is that? i told that to the ama guy and he says, blame these magazines. >> you don't need retouching quite frankly and i do blame the magazines for making you think that you must be perfect. magazines won't go along with this. with any change, right? >> yeah, the ama is hoping that they'll listen to these guidelines and the girl scouts of america loved what they're doing but the reality of the situation is, you know, photographers and the media and the campaigns really don't want to change anything. >> so talking about the 10 pounds, when the guy made your face fatter. >> he made -- it was really cool set called portrait professional, the p
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)